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Palacio Nacional, Mexico

Palacio Nacional, Mexico

Palacio Nacional in Mexico (Mexican National Palace). Find out more information about the Palacio Nacional, house of Mexico's government.

One of the places you should visit in Mexico is the Palacio Nacional, or National Palace. The National Palace is a three-story building located in Mexico City. Mexico's Liberty Bell hangs on a niche in the palace. The Palacio Nacional also houses the Mexican government's executive branch.

The Palacio Nacional was originally built in 1563 on the site of the Moctezuma's Palace. The building was burnt down in 1659, and again in 1692. It was reconstructed in 1693 into the structure we see today, with only several changes made throughout the years. In 1926, a third floor was added to the palace. The palace had been remodeled recently, from the year 1999 to 2000.

In 1821, the palace was named Palacio Nacional after Mexico's War of Indepedence versus Spain. The name was changed by Maximilian I to the Imperial Palace, which was again renamed to its original Palacio Nacional after the Mexican Empire ended.

Initially, all three branches of the government, namely legislative, executive and judicial stayed in the palace. Eventually, only the executive branch would remain. The Palacio Nacional also used to be the residence of the Mexican President.

In the early to mid-1900s, Diego Rivera, a famous muralist, painted a collection of huge murals on the walls of the palace. Spanning over a thousand square feet, his murals illustrate the colorful history of Mexico. One of the more famous ones, entitled the “Epic of the Mexican People in Their Struggle for Freedom and Independence, can still be viewed today.

A gallery of Presidents can also be seen in the National Palace. Former President Benito Juarez, who served for two terms, also has a museum dedicated to him.

The National Palace is located in the Plaza de la Constitucion. Admission to the National Palace is free.