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The New Novel and the Boom

The Boom of Latin American Literature

Since the 1960s, the Spanish-American fictional landscape has created a literary revolution in the search for the true novel or Novel of Synthesis. In these the authors seek a perfect novel that is a world unto itself and examples of this type of novel would be Hundred Years of Solitude by Colombian writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Julio Cortazar's Hopscotch.

In One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel García Márquez takes us back to Macondo, a fictional town founded by the Buendia family with impressive magic and reality in perfect harmony. Before this novel, García Márquez was shaping the world of Macondo in his earlier short stories. We could say that the genesis of Macondo is the story.

García Márquez himself acknowledges that Macondo was inspired by his hometown, Aracataca, and the name comes from a banana plantation. From childhood, he was intrigued by this name, but it was upon reaching adulthood that he realised it was the poetic nature of the name that attracted him. The story of Macondo is the story of America: The Origins, colonization, the magical worlds struggle to survive, but it is also a world history.

The novel is a prime example of Magic Realism and the action of the book takes place during seven generations of the Buendia family. Although we have no dates or places, the novel is framed between the XIX and XX century in Colombia, but the significance of the novel has made it universally applicable and this has become one of the most translated works, and also one of the most read in Spanish.

Another major success of the Total or Synthetic novel is Rayuela, by Julio Cortázar. Rayuela is a brilliant novel in structure, can be read in countless ways. It consists of 155 chapters divided into three parts: "On the side there," "this side" and "both sides." To read the book many would choose the orthodox way of reading, ie, starting with the first chapter and ending on the last, or one can follow the Tablero de Dirección suggested by Cortazar in each chapter: (73 - 1 - 2 to 116 - 3 - 84 - 4 to 71 - 5 - 81 to 74 - 6 - 7 to 8 - 93 - 68-9 - 104 - 10 to 65 - 11 - 136-12 - 106 - 13-115 - 14 - 114 to 117 - 15 - 120 - 16 to 137 - 17 - 97 to 18 - 153 - 19 to 90 - 20 - 126 to 21 - 79 - 22 to 62 - 23 - 124 to 128 - 24 - 134-25 - 141 - 60 to 26 - 109 - 27 - 28 to 130 - 151 - 152 to 143 - 100 - 76 to 101 - 144 - 92 to 103 - 108 - 64 to 155 - 123 - 145 to 122 - 112 - 154-85 - 150 - 95-146 - 29 - 107 - 113-30 - 57 - 70 to 147 - 31 - 32 to 132 - 61 - 33 to 67 - 83 - 142 to 34 - 87 - 105 to 96 - 94 - 91 to 82 - 99 - 35-121 - 36 to 37 - 98 - 38 to 39 - 86 - 78 to 40

With Cortázar, the author is freed completely from the composition of the novel, since it is the reader who can choose the way in which to read it.

Cortázar also worked on short stories, like many other Spanish American authors. In this genre one can see his works such as “Historias de Cronopios e Infamias " and the book " Bestiario." Both of transport us into the magical world of the author.

Mario Vargas Llosa, who won the Nobel prize for literature in 2010, is one of the most influential authors as regards literature during the "boom" and as regards the modern Latin America novel. Her works are recognised internationally.